Be For Change

editor

One Aware mag - a journey update

OneAware MagazineAna Carneiro

Hi there!

It's been eight months since I wrote about starting a magazine - an incredible eight months of fun, struggle, and, above all, connection - and so I thought it was time to write again. As I sit to blog today, Be For Change has launched an introductory issue in Summer (grab a free copy here) (oops! We've run out of print copies!!! email me at hello@be-for-change.com to request a PDF) and our Issue 001 is going out in a couple of days (you can pre-order your copy now)!

As many a good journey, this one did not go as expected. I had plenty of ideas to start with, and I thought I had a clear vision of where I was going. But it didn't take long before I was scrambling for answers to questions I had forgotten to consider. Right at that time, my idea of what would become One Aware magazine started being shaped by the input of others - and I am a bit embarrassed to admit that I struggled with that. I hadn't expected to make it all happen by myself, but I am usually a bit of a lone wolf when it comes to my work. More than that, if eight months ago you had told me how comfortable I would be today relying on others for help, I would have raised an eyebrow (maybe even two). But here I am.

Nowadays I am incredibly happy about the small family that has gathered around One Aware. These are the people who act as a sounding board for ideas in their lunch breaks, call me when I send a sad text about something that went wrong, spell check the articles when they get home after work. Not a single person who helped bring this magazine to life works in publication, or for Be For Change; nope, everyone is elsewhere employed and worked on One Aware in their spare time. They deserve a big round of applause! (oh wait, this ain't a speech... Can you give them some love in the comments?).

These are not the only relationships which have resulted in the amazing feeling of connection I mentioned earlier. It might seem weird, but I feel like I am now connected with everyone who has put work forward to this publication. I get to read each story and see all artwork submissions as they come through our inbox. Most of the time, I open the company's email only to find there is nothing new, but in some awesome days there is an email or two titled 'Submission' - and I practically jump, and get wide grin in my face. It is honestly a privilege to see what our audience submits, even if not all work makes it to print. You are such a diverse bunch, pursuing so many different things in life! I do hope that the magazine does you justice, and I hope that you feel as inspired reading it as I feel when I first open those emails. By the way, I love replying to your emails, asking further questions about what you do and getting more details to edit into your texts. It is my absolute favourite thing when our contributors react to finding out that their work is going into One Aware! (Maybe for the next issue I'll ask to share a few of those emails, because you guys/girls have had some pretty awesome things to say!) (This is yet another reason why we'll keep working with artists and writers who are still establishing their names :)

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As I wrote before, there have been plenty of struggles too. And the worst part is that it's usually me who inadvertently created whatever difficult situations. From failing to communicate what I needed and getting frustrated when people delivered the 'wrong' things, to failing in time management and getting stressed as deadlines fail again and again.

There's truly less than a handful of people bringing One Aware to life, and most of the time it's really just two people: Sam (the graphic designer who does more than fits his job description) and me. We ideate, execute and push each other through all the big tasks and menial ones too. With an increasing amount of work for each issue, it feels increasingly hard not being able to pay my One Aware fam for all that they contribute. It is our hope that we've proved the value of this independent publication with this issue, that sales will follow and we'll be able to secure a few sponsors for the Spring issue. I would be living in a dream if by then the magazine was financially viable, with enough money to pay contributors and for a small space where we can all work together without being in the way of our flatmates.

Other challenges anyone in our generation might face, namely the struggle to print sustainably and at a decent price. It is honestly ridiculous that sustainable printing and paper aren't the norm yet - but once again, we have the power to cast a vote with our money. And so we did, even though it means spending more money and the magazine being more expensive (fact: we'll need to sell a lot just to break even, so if you can contribute and purchase with purpose, that would be hugely appreciated!) A couple of years back I would have turned in a different direction; but not now. I am learning with my mistakes and doing my best to get One Aware off the ground, because I really believe in the importance of putting in print the thoughts and experiences of our generation.

It is true that for the most part Millennials are a digital generation, but we also value print. We treat our books and magazines with respect, and proudly scatter them around the house. In a world gone largely digital, we still choose to pay more for words and images on paper. We trust in pages we can hold and smell to keep the messages that matter to us, close to us. With print we can borrow and lend and pass onto other people - with a nice handwritten message on the inside cover.

 

OneAware - the first Editor's Letter

OneAware MagazineAna CarneiroComment
Flower II, artwork by  Edo Modeney Studio

Flower II, artwork by Edo Modeney Studio

A few of you have asked for more detail on what is OneAware and what are we trying to do with it. Those are questions I tried to address in the first Editor's Letter in the introductory issue of OneAware - so I thought it would be good to make the whole text public!


OneAware is a new lifestyle publication with a focus on mindfulness and sustainable living. It aims to bring awareness to the struggles of millennials, both personal and generational. It creates a hopeful atmosphere by sharing real life examples of how others in our generation have dealt with them. It does not aim to be like other wellness publications, we do not feel the need to gender-market the practice of mindfulness, nor do we claim that the answers to being wiser, happier or more balanced lie here. Neither me nor the contributors can tell you what you’ll find should you embark on your journey to be Aware, because that journey is, well, yours! The decision to take the first step and each other step after that are yours, and we won’t be prescribing you ’10 steps to…’ anything, as we find the off the beaten path journey to make for the best stories.

Instead, I hope the contents in each issue give you reason to pause and think, that they instil in you the desire to be more open to the world you live in and create a positive impact when you act. I started this project because in the last couple of years, working in London, I’ve learnt so many lessons from the lives of ‘ordinary’ people. It filled me with wonder and made me I want to create a record of stories from a generation that is self-experimenting and has plenty to say. I’m interested in looking closely at life, not just through my eyes, but yours too.
There are many ways in which I hope this magazine presents a parallel to life: I hope you meet strangers with whom you quickly identify, that you have chance encounters with ideas that are surprisingly close to your heart, that you find yourself questioning what goes on around you and your thoughts on it.

Over here, we believe in the value of print; in slowing down as you touch and smell the paper, as you turn each page and absorb its contents. Each element of this magazine has been carefully selected, and, call me a romantic, I hope the effort and pride of each person involved can be felt by you as you hold it.

This is our first issue and it is an attempt to show the spirit and style of what we hope will become a much thicker, bi-annual publication. This issue has Time as its theme, and its articles reference how we perceive it, rationalise it, loose ourselves in its rhythm and learn to be patient about it.

Tyson writes about how he let go of a busy life to create space for the things he loves and gives the advice he’d share with a friend in simplifying. He poses some challenging questions that will have you take a moment in this wonderful introduction to intentional living.

Edoardo, who’s artwork graces our cover, discusses how he attempts to create positive emotions in the viewers of his work to make them feel lighter for a moment.

In Modern Life Kairos, Flo explores how we may be failing to fully enjoy our quality time when measuring it chronologically.

In this issue, we have two people sharing their journeys into mindfulness. Zion discusses in an interview how his childhood and subsequent quest to find himself led to an interest in meditation and a life guided by values. Jenny tells her powerful story of how she had to create self-loving habits to gain the strength to break away from an abusive relationship and see herself as ‘whole’.

Finally, João Couto takes a look at how good architecture has the power to make us loose track of time.


Would you like to read the whole issue? You can order it free (pay only for shipping) or request a PDF version by email (drop me a line at hello@be-for-change.com)

I hope you enjoy your moments reading OneAware - and if you do, it would mean a lot to me if you shared it with friends and gave us your support in going forward! Ana